Tag Archives: income tax

Legislative scorecard: Updated bill watch list 5.16.16

Below please find an updated list of bills OCPA Impact is watching for potential use in the legislative scorecard we will release following Oklahoma’s 2016 legislative session.

OCPA Impact’s scorecard will focus on legislation related to broad-base issues of economic freedom, free enterprise, individual opportunity, limited state government, and federalism.

We intend to send an updated watch list to legislators whenever changes are made to the list. We also intend to track and score committee and floor votes on bills included in the final scorecard. [For more on OCPA Impact’s scorecard of how legislators voted in Oklahoma’s 2015 session, click here.]

OCPA Impact legislative scorecard – bill watch list 5.16.16

SB 18 – Loveless – SUPPORT

SB 68 – Holt – Authorizing authority for new municipal charter schools – WATCH

SB 127 – David – Appointment of Oklahoma Health Care Authority director – SUPPORT

SB 298 – Quinn/Mulready – Unclaimed property fund – WATCH

SB 383 – Bice – Alcohol sales modernization – SUPPORT (all votes after 3/10)

SB 609 – Jolley – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 624 – Griffin – Eliminate income tax for classroom teachers – SUPPORT

SB 838 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 883 – Mazzei/Denney – WATCH

SB 920 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 977 – Mazzei – Moratorium of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1073 – Mazzei – Cancel Jan. 1, 2016, income tax rate reduction – OPPOSE

SB 1137 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1171 – Standridge – Utilize Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund – WATCH

SB 1181 – Loveless – Public school districts fiscal report card – SUPPORT

SB 1187 – Jolley/Hickman – Public school deregulation – SUPPORT

SB 1189 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1190 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1191 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1280 – Loveless – Direct family tax credit; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1298 – Dahm – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

SB 1324 – Treat – Limiting funding for prekindergarten education programs – WATCH

SB 1384 – Ford – Public school district consolidation – WATCH

SB 1401 – Dahm – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1422 – Griffin – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

SB 1425 – Dahm – Re-certification of public-sector employee unions – SUPPORT

SB 1487 – Newberry – Teacher pay raise – WATCH

SB 1500 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SB 1502 – David – Medicaid eligibility verification – WATCH

SB 1504 – Standridge – Welfare benefits reform – WATCH

SB 1606 – Elimination of “double deduction” ($97 million income tax increase) – OPPOSE (all votes after 5/15)

SJR 41 – Holt – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 56 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SJR 68 – Jolley – Alcohol sales modernization – SUPPORT (all votes after 2/29)

SJR 72 – Standridge/Jordan – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 73 – Brecheen – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HB 1440 – Caldwell – School board term limits – SUPPORT

HB 1581 – Park – Federal funds transparency – WATCH

HB 1696 – Nelson/Holt – Charter school expansion – SUPPORT

HB 1747 – Newell/Schulz – Rural opportunity zones – SUPPORT

HB 1748 – Newell/Treat – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 1802 (FA 2) – Morrissette – Negating previously established protections against excessive local restrictions on energy production – OPPOSE

HB 2003 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 2199 – Calvey – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 2472 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2474 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2475 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2478 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2479 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2692 – Brumbaugh – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 2693 – Sears – Directing more public education dollars to classrooms – WATCH

HB 2751 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2803 – “Medicaid Rebalancing” plan, i.e., Medicaid expansion – OPPOSE

HB 2818 – Denney/Smalley – WATCH

HB 2824 – Denney – Consolidate dependent public school districts – WATCH

HB 2838 – Echols – Savings accounts for disabled Oklahomans – WATCH

HB 2839 – Echols – Cost-of-living adjustments – WATCH

HB 2864 – Christian – Public safety – WATCH

HB 2927 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for leave time – WATCH

HB 2928 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for sick time – WATCH

HB 2947 – Henke – Regulation of parental education choice programs – OPPOSE

HB 2949 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3055 – Newell – School board recall elections – SUPPORT

HB 3059 – Newell – Affecting alcohol licenses for movie theaters – WATCH

HB 3060 – Newell – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

HB 3061 – Newell – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 3065 – Newell – WATCH

HB 3066 – Newell – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 3067 – Newell – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3068 – Newell – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 3102 – Caldwell – Increases classroom hours for adjunct teachers – WATCH

HB 3129 – Cockroft – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

HB 3162 – Hickman – Judicial Nominating Commission – WATCH

HB 3208 – License plate fee – OPPOSE

HB 3210 – Cigarette tax increase – OPPOSE

HJR 1036 – Jordan/Standridge – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HJR 1037 – Calvey – Elect state Supreme Court justices – WATCH

HJR 1058 – Cox – Cigarette tax increase – OPPOSE

HJR 1061 – Nelson – Judicial nomination reform – WATCH

HJR 1062 – Grau – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

Legislative scorecard: Updated bill watch list 5.9.16

Below please find an updated list of bills OCPA Impact is watching for potential use in the legislative scorecard we will release following Oklahoma’s 2016 legislative session.

OCPA Impact’s scorecard will focus on legislation related to broad-base issues of economic freedom, free enterprise, individual opportunity, limited state government, and federalism.

We intend to send an updated watch list to legislators whenever changes are made to the list. We also intend to track and score committee and floor votes on bills included in the final scorecard. [For more on OCPA Impact’s scorecard of how legislators voted in Oklahoma’s 2015 session, click here.]

OCPA Impact legislative scorecard – bill watch list 5.9.16

SB 18 – Loveless – SUPPORT

SB 68 – Holt – Authorizing authority for new municipal charter schools – WATCH

SB 127 – David – Appointment of Oklahoma Health Care Authority director – SUPPORT

SB 298 – Quinn/Mulready – Unclaimed property fund – WATCH

SB 383 – Bice – Alcohol sales modernization – SUPPORT (all votes after 3/10)

SB 609 – Jolley – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 624 – Griffin – Eliminate income tax for classroom teachers – SUPPORT

SB 838 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 883 – Mazzei/Denney – WATCH

SB 920 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 977 – Mazzei – Moratorium of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1073 – Mazzei – Cancel Jan. 1, 2016, income tax rate reduction – OPPOSE

SB 1137 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1171 – Standridge – Utilize Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund – WATCH

SB 1181 – Loveless – Public school districts fiscal report card – SUPPORT

SB 1187 – Jolley/Hickman – Public school deregulation – SUPPORT

SB 1189 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1190 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1191 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1280 – Loveless – Direct family tax credit; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1298 – Dahm – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

SB 1324 – Treat – Limiting funding for prekindergarten education programs – WATCH

SB 1384 – Ford – Public school district consolidation – WATCH

SB 1401 – Dahm – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1422 – Griffin – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

SB 1425 – Dahm – Re-certification of public-sector employee unions – SUPPORT

SB 1487 – Newberry – Teacher pay raise – WATCH

SB 1500 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SB 1502 – David – Medicaid eligibility verification – WATCH

SB 1504 – Standridge – Welfare benefits reform – WATCH

SJR 41 – Holt – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 56 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SJR 68 – Jolley – Alcohol sales modernization – SUPPORT (all votes after 2/29)

SJR 72 – Standridge/Jordan – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 73 – Brecheen – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HB 1440 – Caldwell – School board term limits – SUPPORT

HB 1581 – Park – Federal funds transparency – WATCH

HB 1696 – Nelson/Holt – Charter school expansion – SUPPORT

HB 1747 – Newell/Schulz – Rural opportunity zones – SUPPORT

HB 1748 – Newell/Treat – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 1802 (FA 2) – Morrissette – Negating previously established protections against excessive local restrictions on energy production – OPPOSE

HB 2003 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 2199 – Calvey – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 2472 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2474 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2475 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2478 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2479 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2692 – Brumbaugh – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 2693 – Sears – Directing more public education dollars to classrooms – WATCH

HB 2751 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2803 – “Medicaid Rebalancing” plan, i.e., Medicaid expansion – OPPOSE

HB 2818 – Denney/Smalley – WATCH

HB 2824 – Denney – Consolidate dependent public school districts – WATCH

HB 2838 – Echols – Savings accounts for disabled Oklahomans – WATCH

HB 2839 – Echols – Cost-of-living adjustments – WATCH

HB 2864 – Christian – Public safety – WATCH

HB 2927 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for leave time – WATCH

HB 2928 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for sick time – WATCH

HB 2947 – Henke – Regulation of parental education choice programs – OPPOSE

HB 2949 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3055 – Newell – School board recall elections – SUPPORT

HB 3059 – Newell – Affecting alcohol licenses for movie theaters – WATCH

HB 3060 – Newell – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

HB 3061 – Newell – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 3065 – Newell – WATCH

HB 3066 – Newell – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 3067 – Newell – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3068 – Newell – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 3102 – Caldwell – Increases classroom hours for adjunct teachers – WATCH

HB 3129 – Cockroft – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

HB 3162 – Hickman – Judicial Nominating Commission – WATCH

HJR 1036 – Jordan/Standridge – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HJR 1037 – Calvey – Elect state Supreme Court justices – WATCH

HJR 1058 – Cox – Cigarette tax increase – OPPOSE

HJR 1061 – Nelson – Judicial nomination reform – WATCH

HJR 1062 – Grau – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

Legislative scorecard: Updated bill watch list 3.10.16

Below please find an updated list of bills OCPA Impact is watching for potential use in the legislative scorecard we will release following Oklahoma’s 2016 legislative session.

OCPA Impact’s scorecard will focus on legislation related to broad-base issues of economic freedom, free enterprise, individual opportunity, limited state government, and federalism.

We intend to send an updated watch list to legislators whenever changes are made to the list. We also intend to track and score committee and floor votes on bills included in the final scorecard. [For more on OCPA Impact’s scorecard of how legislators voted in Oklahoma’s 2015 session, click here.]

OCPA Impact legislative scorecard – bill watch list 3.10.16

SB 18 – Loveless – SUPPORT

SB 68 – Holt – Authorizing authority for new municipal charter schools – WATCH

SB 127 – David – Appointment of Oklahoma Health Care Authority director – SUPPORT

SB 298 – Quinn/Mulready – Unclaimed property fund – WATCH

SB 383 – Bice – Alcohol sales modernization – SUPPORT (all votes after 3/10)

SB 609 – Jolley – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 624 – Griffin – Eliminate income tax for classroom teachers – SUPPORT

SB 838 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 883 – Mazzei/Denney – WATCH

SB 920 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 977 – Mazzei – Moratorium of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1073 – Mazzei – Cancel Jan. 1, 2016, income tax rate reduction – OPPOSE

SB 1137 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1171 – Standridge – Utilize Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund – WATCH

SB 1181 – Loveless – Public school districts fiscal report card – SUPPORT

SB 1187 – Jolley/Hickman – Public school deregulation – SUPPORT

SB 1189 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1190 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1191 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1280 – Loveless – Direct family tax credit; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1298 – Dahm – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

SB 1324 – Treat – Limiting funding for prekindergarten education programs – WATCH

SB 1384 – Ford – Public school district consolidation – WATCH

SB 1401 – Dahm – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1422 – Griffin – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

SB 1425 – Dahm – Re-certification of public-sector employee unions – SUPPORT

SB 1487 – Newberry – Teacher pay raise – WATCH

SB 1500 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SB 1502 – David – Medicaid eligibility verification – WATCH

SB 1504 – Standridge – Welfare benefits reform – WATCH

SJR 41 – Holt – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 56 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SJR 68 – Jolley – Alcohol sales modernization – SUPPORT (all votes after 2/29)

SJR 72 – Standridge/Jordan – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 73 – Brecheen – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HB 1440 – Caldwell – School board term limits – SUPPORT

HB 1581 – Park – Federal funds transparency – WATCH

HB 1696 – Nelson/Holt – Charter school expansion – SUPPORT

HB 1747 – Newell/Schulz – Rural opportunity zones – SUPPORT

HB 1748 – Newell/Treat – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 1802 (FA 2) – Morrissette – Negating previously established protections against excessive local restrictions on energy production – OPPOSE

HB 2003 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 2199 – Calvey – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 2472 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2474 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2475 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2478 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2479 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2692 – Brumbaugh – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 2693 – Sears – Directing more public education dollars to classrooms – WATCH

HB 2751 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2818 – Denney/Smalley – WATCH

HB 2824 – Denney – Consolidate dependent public school districts – WATCH

HB 2838 – Echols – Savings accounts for disabled Oklahomans – WATCH

HB 2839 – Echols – Cost-of-living adjustments – WATCH

HB 2864 – Christian – Public safety – WATCH

HB 2927 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for leave time – WATCH

HB 2928 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for sick time – WATCH

HB 2947 – Henke – Regulation of parental education choice programs – OPPOSE

HB 2949 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3055 – Newell – School board recall elections – SUPPORT

HB 3059 – Newell – Affecting alcohol licenses for movie theaters – WATCH

HB 3060 – Newell – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

HB 3061 – Newell – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 3065 – Newell – WATCH

HB 3066 – Newell – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 3067 – Newell – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3068 – Newell – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 3102 – Caldwell – Increases classroom hours for adjunct teachers – WATCH

HB 3129 – Cockroft – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

HB 3162 – Hickman – Judicial Nominating Commission – WATCH

HJR 1036 – Jordan/Standridge – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HJR 1037 – Calvey – Elect state Supreme Court justices – WATCH

HJR 1058 – Cox – Cigarette tax increase – OPPOSE

HJR 1061 – Nelson – Judicial nomination reform – WATCH

HJR 1062 – Grau – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

Legislative scorecard: Updated bill watch list 2.22.16

Below please find an updated list of bills OCPA Impact is watching for potential use in the legislative scorecard we will release following Oklahoma’s 2016 legislative session.

OCPA Impact’s scorecard will focus on legislation related to broad-base issues of economic freedom, free enterprise, individual opportunity, limited state government, and federalism.

We intend to send an updated watch list to legislators whenever changes are made to the list. We also intend to track and score committee and floor votes on bills included in the final scorecard. [For more on OCPA Impact’s scorecard of how legislators voted in Oklahoma’s 2015 session, please click here.]

To search for more info on any of these bills, click here.

OCPA Impact legislative scorecard – bill watch list 2.22.16

SB 18 – Loveless – SUPPORT

SB 68 – Holt – Authorizing authority for new municipal charter schools – WATCH

SB 127 – David – Appointment of Oklahoma Health Care Authority director – SUPPORT

SB 298 – Quinn/Mulready – Unclaimed property fund – WATCH

SB 383 – Bice – Alcohol sales modernization – WATCH

SB 609 – Jolley – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 624 – Griffin – Eliminate income tax for classroom teachers – SUPPORT

SB 838 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 883 – Mazzei/Denney – WATCH

SB 920 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 977 – Mazzei – Moratorium of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1073 – Mazzei – Cancel Jan. 1, 2016, income tax rate reduction – OPPOSE

SB 1137 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1171 – Standridge – Utilize Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund – WATCH

SB 1181 – Loveless – Public school districts fiscal report card – SUPPORT

SB 1189 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1190 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1191 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1280 – Loveless – Direct family tax credit; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1298 – Dahm – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

SB 1324 – Treat – Limiting funding for prekindergarten education programs – WATCH

SB 1384 – Ford – Public school district consolidation – WATCH

SB 1401 – Dahm – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1422 – Griffin – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

SB 1425 – Dahm – Re-certification of public-sector employee unions – SUPPORT

SB 1487 – Newberry – Teacher pay raise – WATCH

SB 1500 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SB 1502 – David – Medicaid eligibility verification – WATCH

SB 1504 – Standridge – Welfare benefits reform – WATCH

SJR 41 – Holt – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 56 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SJR 68 – Jolley – Alcohol sales modernization – WATCH

SJR 72 – Standridge/Jordan – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 73 – Brecheen – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HB 1440 – Caldwell – School board term limits – SUPPORT

HB 1581 – Park – Federal funds transparency – WATCH

HB 1696 – Nelson/Holt – Charter school expansion – SUPPORT

HB 1747 – Newell/Schulz – Rural opportunity zones – SUPPORT

HB 1748 – Newell/Treat – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 2003 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 2199 – Calvey – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 2472 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2474 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2475 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2478 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2479 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2692 – Brumbaugh – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 2693 – Sears – Directing more public education dollars to classrooms – WATCH

HB 2751 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2818 – Denney/Smalley – WATCH

HB 2824 – Denney – Consolidate dependent public school districts – WATCH

HB 2838 – Echols – Savings accounts for disabled Oklahomans – WATCH

HB 2839 – Echols – Cost-of-living adjustments – WATCH

HB 2864 – Christian – Public safety – WATCH

HB 2927 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for leave time – WATCH

HB 2928 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for sick time – WATCH

HB 2947 – Henke – Regulation of parental education choice programs – OPPOSE

HB 2949 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3055 – Newell – School board recall elections – SUPPORT

HB 3059 – Newell – Affecting alcohol licenses for movie theaters – WATCH

HB 3060 – Newell – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

HB 3061 – Newell – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 3065 – Newell – WATCH

HB 3066 – Newell – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 3067 – Newell – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3068 – Newell – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 3102 – Caldwell – Increases classroom hours for adjunct teachers – WATCH

HB 3129 – Cockroft – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

HB 3162 – Hickman – Judicial Nominating Commission – WATCH

HJR 1036 – Jordan/Standridge – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HJR 1037 – Calvey – Elect state Supreme Court justices – WATCH

HJR 1058 – Cox – Cigarette tax increase – OPPOSE

HJR 1061 – Nelson – Judicial nomination reform – WATCH

HJR 1062 – Grau – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

Legislative scorecard: Updated bill watch list 2.16.16

Below please find an updated list of bills OCPA Impact is watching for potential use in the legislative scorecard we will release following Oklahoma’s 2016 legislative session. Several bills have been added to the list.

OCPA Impact’s scorecard will focus on legislation related to broad-base issues of economic freedom, free enterprise, individual opportunity, limited state government, and federalism.

We intend to notify legislators when bills are added to the watch list, prior to votes on those bills. We also intend to track and score committee and floor votes on bills included in the final scorecard. [For more on OCPA Impact’s scorecard of how legislators voted in Oklahoma’s 2015 session, please click here.]

To search for more info on any of these bills, click here.

OCPA Impact legislative scorecard – bill watch list 2.16.16

SB 18 – Loveless – SUPPORT

SB 68 – Holt – Authorizing authority for new municipal charter schools – WATCH

SB 127 – David – Appointment of Oklahoma Health Care Authority director – SUPPORT

SB 298 – Quinn/Mulready – Unclaimed property fund – WATCH

SB 383 – Bice – Alcohol sales modernization – WATCH

SB 609 – Jolley – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 624 – Griffin – Eliminate income tax for classroom teachers – SUPPORT

SB 838 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 920 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – WATCH

SB 977 – Mazzei – Moratorium of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1073 – Mazzei – Cancel Jan. 1, 2016, income tax rate reduction – OPPOSE

SB 1137 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – WATCH

SB 1171 – Standridge – Utilize Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund – WATCH

SB 1181 – Loveless – Public school districts fiscal report card – SUPPORT

SB 1189 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1190 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1191 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1280 – Loveless – Direct family tax credit; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1298 – Dahm – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

SB 1324 – Treat – Limiting funding for prekindergarten education programs – WATCH

SB 1384 – Ford – Public school district consolidation – WATCH

SB 1401 – Dahm – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1422 – Griffin – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

SB 1425 – Dahm – Re-certification of public-sector employee unions – SUPPORT

SB 1487 – Newberry – Teacher pay raise – WATCH

SB 1500 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SB 1502 – David – Medicaid eligibility verification – WATCH

SB 1504 – Standridge – Welfare benefits reform – WATCH

SJR 41 – Holt – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 56 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SJR 68 – Jolley – Alcohol sales modernization – WATCH

SJR 72 – Standridge/Jordan – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 73 – Brecheen – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HB 1440 – Caldwell – School board term limits – SUPPORT

HB 1581 – Park – Federal funds transparency – WATCH

HB 1696 – Nelson/Holt – Charter school expansion – SUPPORT

HB 1747 – Newell/Schulz – Rural opportunity zones – SUPPORT

HB 1748 – Newell/Treat – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 2003 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 2199 – Calvey – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 2472 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2474 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2475 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2478 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2479 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2692 – Brumbaugh – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 2693 – Sears – Directing more public education dollars to classrooms – WATCH

HB 2751 – Peterson – Criminal justice reform – WATCH

HB 2824 – Denney – Consolidate dependent public school districts – WATCH

HB 2838 – Echols – Savings accounts for disabled Oklahomans – WATCH

HB 2839 – Echols – Cost-of-living adjustments – WATCH

HB 2864 – Christian – Public safety – WATCH

HB 2927 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for leave time – WATCH

HB 2928 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for sick time – WATCH

HB 2947 – Henke – Regulation of parental education choice programs – WATCH

HB 2949 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3055 – Newell – School board recall elections – SUPPORT

HB 3059 – Newell – Affecting alcohol licenses for movie theaters – WATCH

HB 3060 – Newell – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

HB 3061 – Newell – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 3065 – Newell – WATCH

HB 3066 – Newell – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 3067 – Newell – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3068 – Newell – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 3102 – Caldwell – Increases classroom hours for adjunct teachers – WATCH

HB 3129 – Cockroft – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

HB 3162 – Hickman – Judicial Nominating Commission – WATCH

HJR 1036 – Jordan/Standridge – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HJR 1037 – Calvey – Elect state Supreme Court justices – WATCH

HJR 1058 – Cox – Cigarette tax increase – OPPOSE

HJR 1061 – Nelson – Judicial nomination reform – WATCH

HJR 1062 – Grau – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

Legislative scorecard: Updated bill watch list 2.14.2016

Below please find an updated list of bills OCPA Impact is watching for potential use in the legislative scorecard we will release following Oklahoma’s 2016 legislative session. Several bills have been added to the list.

OCPA Impact’s scorecard will focus on legislation related to broad-base issues of economic freedom, free enterprise, individual opportunity, limited state government, and federalism.

We intend to notify legislators when bills are added to the watch list, prior to votes on those bills. We also intend to track and score committee and floor votes on bills included in the final scorecard. [For more on OCPA Impact’s scorecard of how legislators voted in Oklahoma’s 2015 session, please click here.]

To search for more info on any of these bills, please visit the Oklahoma Legislature’s bill search tool.

OCPA Impact legislative scorecard – bill watch list 2.8.2016

SB 18 – Loveless – SUPPORT

SB 68 – Holt – Authorizing authority for new municipal charter schools – WATCH

SB 127 – David – Appointment of Oklahoma Health Care Authority director – SUPPORT

SB 298 – Quinn/Mulready – Unclaimed property fund – WATCH

SB 383 – Bice – Alcohol sales modernization – WATCH

SB 609 – Jolley – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 624 – Griffin – Eliminate income tax for classroom teachers – SUPPORT

SB 838 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 920 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – WATCH

SB 977 – Mazzei – Moratorium of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – OPPOSE

SB 1137 – Brecheen – Sunset of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – WATCH

SB 1171 – Standridge – Utilize Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund – WATCH

SB 1181 – Loveless – Public school districts fiscal report card – SUPPORT

SB 1189 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1190 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1191 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – SUPPORT

SB 1280 – Loveless – Direct family tax credit; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1298 – Dahm – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

SB 1324 – Treat – Limiting funding for prekindergarten education programs – WATCH

SB 1384 – Ford – Public school district consolidation – WATCH

SB 1401 – Dahm – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1422 – Griffin – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

SB 1425 – Dahm – Re-certification of public-sector employee unions – SUPPORT

SB 1487 – Newberry – Teacher pay raise – WATCH

SB 1500 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SB 1502 – David – Medicaid eligibility verification – WATCH

SB 1504 – Standridge – Welfare benefits reform – WATCH

SJR 41 – Holt – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 56 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – OPPOSE

SJR 68 – Jolley – Alcohol sales modernization – WATCH

SJR 72 – Standridge/Jordan – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

SJR 73 – Brecheen – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HB 1440 – Caldwell – School board term limits – SUPPORT

HB 1581 – Park – Federal funds transparency – WATCH

HB 1696 – Nelson/Holt – Charter school expansion – SUPPORT

HB 1747 – Newell/Schulz – Rural opportunity zones – SUPPORT

HB 1748 – Newell/Treat – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 2003 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 2199 – Calvey – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 2692 – Brumbaugh – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 2693 – Sears – Directing more public education dollars to classrooms – WATCH

HB 2824 – Denney – Consolidate dependent public school districts – WATCH

HB 2838 – Echols – Savings accounts for disabled Oklahomans – WATCH

HB 2839 – Echols – Cost-of-living adjustments – WATCH

HB 2864 – Christian – Public safety – WATCH

HB 2927 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for leave time – WATCH

HB 2928 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for sick time – WATCH

HB 2947 – Henke – Regulation of parental education choice programs – WATCH

HB 2949 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3055 – Newell – School board recall elections – SUPPORT

HB 3059 – Newell – Affecting alcohol licenses for movie theaters – WATCH

HB 3060 – Newell – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

HB 3061 – Newell – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 3065 – Newell – WATCH

HB 3066 – Newell – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 3067 – Newell – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3068 – Newell – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 3102 – Caldwell – Increases classroom hours for adjunct teachers – WATCH

HB 3129 – Cockroft – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

HB 3162 – Hickman – Judicial Nominating Commission – WATCH

HJR 1036 – Jordan/Standridge – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

HJR 1037 – Calvey – Elect state Supreme Court justices – WATCH

HJR 1058 – Cox – Cigarette tax increase – OPPOSE

HJR 1061 – Nelson – Judicial nomination reform – WATCH

HJR 1062 – Grau – Repeal of Blaine Amendment – WATCH

Legislative scorecard: Initial bill watch list 2.8.2016

Below please find the initial list of bills OCPA Impact is watching for potential use in the legislative scorecard we will release following Oklahoma’s 2016 legislative session.

OCPA Impact’s scorecard will focus on legislation related to broad-base issues of economic freedom, free enterprise, individual opportunity, limited state government, and federalism.

We intend to notify legislators when bills are added or removed from the watch list, prior to votes on those bills. We also intend to track and score committee and floor votes on bills included in the final scorecard. [For more on OCPA Impact’s scorecard of how legislators voted in Oklahoma’s 2015 session, please click here.]

To search for more info on any of these bills, please visit the Oklahoma Legislature’s bill search tool.

OCPA Impact legislative scorecard — bill watch list 2.8.2016

SB 68 – Holt – Authorizing authority for new municipal charter schools – WATCH

SB 127 – David – Appointment of Oklahoma Health Care Authority director – SUPPORT

SB 383 – Bice – Alcohol sales modernization – WATCH

SB 609 – Jolley – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 624 – Griffin – Eliminate income tax for classroom teachers – SUPPORT

SB 838 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – WATCH

SB 920 – Brecheen – Sunsets Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – WATCH

SB 977 – Mazzei – Moratorium of Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship – WATCH

SB 1171 – Standridge – Utilize Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust Fund – WATCH

SB 1181 – Loveless – Public school districts fiscal report card – SUPPORT

SB 1189 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – WATCH

SB 1190 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – WATCH

SB 1191 – Loveless – Civil asset forfeiture reform – WATCH

SB 1280 – Loveless – Direct family tax credit; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1298 – Dahm – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

SB 1324 – Treat – Limiting funding for prekindergarten education programs – WATCH

SB 1384 – Ford – Public school district consolidation – WATCH

SB 1401 – Dahm – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

SB 1422 – Griffin – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

SB 1425 – Dahm – Re-certification of public-sector employee unions – SUPPORT

SB 1487 – Newberry – Teacher pay raise – WATCH

SB 1500 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – WATCH

SB 1502 – David – Medicaid eligibility verification – WATCH

SB 1504 – Standridge – Welfare benefits reform – WATCH

SJR 56 – Standridge – Medicaid reform rollback – WATCH

SJR 68 – Jolley – Alcohol sales modernization – WATCH

HB 1440 – Caldwell – School board term limits – SUPPORT

HB 1581 – Park – Federal funds transparency – WATCH

HB 1696 – Nelson/Holt – Charter school expansion – SUPPORT

HB 1747 – Newell/Schulz – Rural opportunity zones – SUPPORT

HB 1748 – Newell/Treat – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 2003 – Nelson – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 2004 – Nelson – Adjustments to special-needs scholarship – WATCH

HB 2199 – Calvey – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 2692 – Brumbaugh – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 2693 – Sears – Directing more public education dollars to classrooms – WATCH

HB 2824 – Denney – Consolidate dependent public school districts – WATCH

HB 2838 – Echols – Savings accounts for disabled Oklahomans – WATCH

HB 2839 – Echols – Cost-of-living adjustments – WATCH

HB 2927 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for leave time – WATCH

HB 2928 – Dunnington – Employer requirements for sick time – WATCH

HB 2947 – Henke – Regulation of parental education choice programs – WATCH

HB 3055 – Newell – School board recall elections – SUPPORT

HB 3059 – Newell – Affecting alcohol licenses for movie theaters – WATCH

HB 3060 – Newell – Adjusting qualifications for public school superintendents – SUPPORT

HB 3061 – Newell – Right-to-work for attorneys – WATCH

HB 3066 – Newell – Income tax rate reduction – SUPPORT

HB 3067 – Newell – Education savings accounts; parental education choice – SUPPORT

HB 3068 – Newell – Federal funds transparency – SUPPORT

HB 3102 – Caldwell – Increases classroom hours for adjunct teachers – WATCH

HB 3129 – Cockroft – Teacher pay raise – SUPPORT

HB 3162 – Hickman – Judicial Nominating Commission – WATCH

HJR 1037 – Calvey – Elect state Supreme Court justices – WATCH

HJR 1058 – Cox – Cigarette tax increase – WATCH

HJR 1061 – Nelson – Judicial nomination reform – WATCH

Results achieved in Oklahoma’s 2015 legislative session

Oklahoma’s 2015 legislative session concluded May 22. At OCPA Impact, we set four objectives prior to the start of session.

These were: (a) enact paycheck protection to safeguard taxpayers from out-of-control government-sector unions, (b) expand options for children to attend schools that best meet their educational needs, (c) advance reforms to reduce the cost curve of state government spending, and (d) continue working to end Oklahoma’s burdensome income tax.

Due to efforts by groups like OCPA Impact and Americans for Prosperity’s Oklahoma chapter – along with growth-minded state lawmakers – results were achieved on these items.

On Apr. 2, Gov. Mary Fallin signed into law House Bill 1749, a paycheck protection measure resembling Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s reforms.

The new law prohibits Oklahoma state government from collecting dues for organizations that collectively bargain against taxpayers at the state agency or school district level. Taxpayers had previously been forced to facilitate dues collections for labor unions that funded extreme political causes.

This session also saw passage of House Bill 1693, updating the Equal Opportunity Education Scholarship, one of two private educational choice programs in Oklahoma.

Established in 2011, the scholarship gives parents access to better educational opportunities for their school-age children. This year’s update makes it easier for students from special populations, including disabled, homeless or abused children, to participate.

Proposals were also promoted to allow parents to utilize another option, Education Savings Accounts (ESAs), to place their children in more suitable educational environments outside the public system. The ESA issue advanced further this year than in 2014 and is alive for next spring’s legislative session.

Passage of House Bill 1566, a significant reform of Oklahoma’s Medicaid system, should help reduce the cost curve of state government spending.

Medicaid has become the fastest-growing area of state spending. Oklahoma’s Medicaid system is fee-for-service, with little emphasis on responsible individual behavior. This has led to cost overruns. The new reform begins a shift to a structure in which care is better coordinated among providers to improve health outcomes for beneficiaries, reducing costs.

There was also progress this session on responsibly ending Oklahoma’s “penalty on work,” the state income tax. With states like Missouri, Kansas and Arkansas reducing tax rates on working families and entrepreneurs, Oklahoma must compete.

Last fall, the Oklahoma Supreme Court upheld the income tax reduction passed by lawmakers earlier in the year. Justices had been expected to throw out – but instead upheld – the reduction, which is still scheduled to lower Oklahoma’s tax rate to 5 percent starting Jan. 1, 2016.

This session, rumblings at the Capitol suggested lawmakers might cancel this tax relief so they could spend more money.

When a left-leaning, New York City pollster said Oklahomans didn’t want a tax reduction next year, numerous opinion surveys by Oklahoma firms were pointed to, debunking this myth.

In the end, lawmakers passed a budget that preserves the upcoming income tax reduction and keeps Oklahoma’s tax rate moving in the right direction – down.

Kansas income tax phaseout: A work in progress, worth emulating in Oklahoma

There are two groups of people in America today: those who work for a living — whether in the public or private sector, employers or employees — and those who do not. Oklahoma must adopt policies that grow the number of working people in the state.

Every state except Michigan saw raw population gains in the last census period. And states consistently see gains in the number of people not working.

However, some states have seen declines in the number of people who are working and filing tax returns. From 1992 through 2011 (the most recent data available), Oklahoma saw an outflow of taxpayers equaling nearly $1 billion in personal income leaving the state. (See here, here.)

Working men and women pay the bulk of the taxes in any given state.  With these dollars, state governments fund schools, roads, prisons and other services.

In the “Obama economy,” Americans have been squeezed ever-tighter by federal taxes and regulations. As a result, state tax and regulatory burdens — including tax rate differences from one state to another — have more noticeable effects on the margins for employers and families.

States consistently leading the nation in economic growth, like Texas, Florida, Arizona and Wyoming, tend to attract more taxpayers than they lose and are better able to fund core government functions. Most charge no income tax or lower tax rates than their neighbors.

States with more workers and taxpayers leaving than staying, like California, Illinois and New York, typically have punitively high taxes and excessive regulations on private-sector activity.

From 1992 through 2011, Kansas saw personal income outflows three times greater than what Oklahoma suffered, as productive citizens left for greener pastures.

There’s a difference, though, between the two states’ trajectories. Kansas continued losing taxpayers each year. Oklahoma saw a turnaround in 2005, when the largest income tax reductions in our state’s history took effect.

Since then, Oklahoma has seen increases in the number of taxpayers living in the state each year, even during the recession. This surge predates, but was certainly aided by, the fracking boom. It has helped produce record funding for schools, roads, Medicaid and other programs.

To experience the successes of states like Texas and Wyoming — two of the best for business (see here, here) — Oklahoma emulated their policies of lower taxes on work and productivity.

After his 2010 election, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback began putting pieces in place for a similar resurgence. Kansas had undergone a “lost decade” of economic stagnation. Brownback’s centerpiece was a major reduction — and eventual phaseout — of his state’s income tax.

By the end of Brownback’s first term, he and growth-minded legislators reduced Kansas’ top tax rate from 6.45 percent to 4.8 percent, eliminated the tax for small businesses — who create a majority of the state’s private-sector jobs — and locked in a gradual phaseout for all Kansans.

Brownback wanted Kansas’ economy to be “a lot more like Texas and a lot less like California.” A worthy goal. Since the start of the recession, more net new jobs have been created in Texas than in the other 49 states combined. After the 2010 Census, California failed to gain a congressional seat for the first time; Texas gained four.

The results since the Kansas tax cuts took effect have been undeniably positive. Kansas is seeing record new small business creation, unemployment is noticeably down, and private-sector growth is beating most nearby states and the national average. The Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council has upgraded its rating of Kansas’ business climate.

Dynamics between Kansas and Missouri illustrate how, since lowering tax rates, Kansas is more competitive for jobs and growth. Missouri has among the highest taxes in the region, and Kansas City, Mo., charges a citywide income tax. Kansas is reducing tax rates, and its side of the Kansas City metro has no city tax. In the 28 months with the Kansas tax cuts in effect, Kansas City, Kan., has outpaced Kansas City, Mo., in job growth and private-sector expansion.

Sometimes income tax reductions, by spurring economic activity, help produce higher tax collections. This was true with Ronald Reagan’s tax cuts in the 1980s and with the gradual reduction of Oklahoma’s income tax from 2005 through 2012.

Kansas is perhaps more challenging. Kansas trimmed one-fourth of its income tax in one year; Oklahoma did so over eight years. In the first full fiscal year with the Kansas tax cuts in place, total tax collections fell; they have since rebounded, though not to pre-tax-cut levels.

In their budget plans, both Brownback and legislators have proposed spending increases. In the midst of the Obama economy, growing the size of government is not advisable. Like in most states, though, Kansas lawmakers face cries by tax consumers for more spending.

Now Brownback and the Legislature are at an impasse. Some legislators suggest increasing tax revenue by restoring the income tax for small businesses. Brownback says no.

Most no-income-tax states spend significantly less on state government, per citizen, than high-tax states. Kansas spends roughly 40 percent more than the no-income-tax states.

The divisive nature of Kansas politics, particularly within the GOP, can make progress difficult on many issues, including spending. Brownback’s predecessor, Mark Parkinson, switched parties in 2006 to be Democrat Gov. Kathleen Sebelius’ running mate; Parkinson became governor in 2009 when Sebelius left office early to implement Pres. Barack Obama’s healthcare law.

Reducing government spending is always difficult. As Reagan said, “(i)t’s just the tendency of government to grow.” Reagan himself was unable to reduce spending while in office.

Still, Kansas policymakers, like counterparts in other states, must better restrain spending to a level that can be supported by taxpayers and still promote real economic growth.

It hasn’t helped that much of the public debate over the Kansas tax cuts has been driven by the Kansas City Star, which is owned by McClatchy, a California media group with an at times liberal bent. The Star has lambasted Brownback, as have usual suspects like the New York Times. The Left does not want the Kansas growth initiative to succeed.

Regardless, Brownback’s accomplishments are significant. No state in the continental U.S. has ever fully eliminated its income tax; Kansas is on track to be the first.

The purpose of eliminating income taxes is to increase economic freedom. Income taxes, in essence, directly penalize citizens for working; this deters people from working and producing more. People and capital are more mobile than ever, and taxpayers today can more easily relocate to welcoming climates.

Brownback’s tax cuts have helped spur the private sector, benefiting Kansans. Missouri lawmakers have taken notice. Last year, they overrode Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto to enact the first income tax reductions in Missouri in over 90 years — including a 50-percent reduction of the tax on small businesses, in direct response to Kansas.

Newly elected governors, including Nebraska’s Pete Ricketts, are working to reduce tax rates to keep up. New Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson signed a tax cut for middle-income households.

Oklahoma taxpayers, particularly small business owners, are now in what Gov. Mary Fallin has called an “income-tax sandwich” between Kansas and Texas.

From 1992 through 2011, Oklahoma stole $247 million in Kansas taxpayers and income. With Brownback’s tax reductions, it’s unlikely Oklahoma will continue luring Kansas workforce and capital at such a clip.

Kansas families, taxpayers and entrepreneurs are better off today than four years ago, thanks to Sunflower State leaders who believe in unleashing economic potential in individuals.

If this motivates Oklahoma policymakers to further reduce our state’s income tax burden, as it has in other states, Oklahomans will be better off also.

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A golden opportunity in Oklahoma following Nov 4 elections

Thoughts following the recent Nov 4 elections:

-In the past quarter-century, Oklahoma has experienced three distinct Republican electoral waves. The first two led to historic improvements in Oklahoma’s economic climate.

The first wave, 1994, resulted in Right to Work becoming law in Oklahoma. The second, 2010, led to landmark workers’ compensation and tort reforms. The third, 2014, presents a golden opportunity to lock in a responsible phaseout of Oklahoma’s burdensome income tax.

-All three waves featured Mary Fallin in a pivotal role. In 1994, she was elected as Oklahoma’s first Republican lieutenant governor and the first woman to hold the office. As presiding officer of the state Senate, she broke a tie vote and allowed Right to Work to advance to the ballot. In 2010, she became the first woman to be elected Oklahoma Governor. As chief executive, she signed workers’ compensation and tort reforms into law.

Now, after being re-elected in 2014, and with the largest GOP legislative majority in state history, Gov. Fallin has the opportunity to yet again make history.

-Every tax-cutting governor on the ballot Nov 4 was re-elected: Scott Walker in Wisconsin, Rick Snyder in Michigan, Susana Martinez in New Mexico, John Kasich in Ohio, Rick Scott in Florida, Paul LePage in Maine.

And Sam Brownback in Kansas. In the past three years, Brownback eliminated state income taxes on small business profits, lowered the income tax rate under 5 percent for all Kansans, and locked in an extended phaseout of both the personal and corporate income tax.

Liberal and conservative media alike expected Brownback to be defeated in his re-election bid. Instead, he and his tax-cutting peers across the country showed that reducing taxes on work, earnings and production is not politically unpopular.

-Candidates for open governorships were already signaling their intent to reduce income taxes on families, individuals and job creators.

Pete Ricketts in Nebraska — in an “income tax sandwich” between Kansas and no-income-tax South Dakota (similar to Oklahoma’s position between Kansas and Texas) — has said he will work to reduce income tax rates. So has Doug Ducey in Arizona, tired of seeing California tax refugees pass over his state en route to no-income-tax Nevada and Texas. Ricketts and Ducey, now elected, can be expected to lead their states in competitive directions.

Also, several gubernatorial contests in states where governors had recently raised taxes saw those offices flip to the other political party, including in Illinois, Maryland and Massachusetts.

-During her campaign, when discussing issues outside of pushing back against Pres. Obama’s extensive overreach, Gov. Fallin perhaps turned most often to her efforts to lower Oklahoma’s income tax. Her 2012 proposal to phase out the tax over time was the boldest policy initiative of her first term.

Now, Oklahoma is presented with a window of opportunity to realize the biggest remaining game-changer in the 50-state competition for jobs and growth. This window isn’t guaranteed to stay open beyond 2018, as anyone who thought Steve Largent would succeed Frank Keating as Governor in 2002 — after Republicans had taken back control of Washington, D.C., and Oklahoma’s electorate had shifted back toward the political middle — can attest.

As we near the first of four legislative sessions comprising Gov. Fallin’s final term, there’s no better time than now to secure a responsible phaseout of Oklahoma’s income tax.